REVIEW: The Far Enough Window by John Grant


Title: The Far Enough Window
Author: John Grant
Illustrator: Ron Tiner
Website of Author: http://www.johngrantpaulbarnett.com/
Website of Publisher: http://www.bewrite.net
Genre: Fantasy
Publication date: 2002
ISBN: 1-904224-79-2
Length: 289 pages
Format: Paperback / eBook

Reviewer: Lucille P Robinson
http://www.lucilleperkinsrobinson.com
Alternative-Read.com
Reviewer for: Alternative-Read.com, BeWrite.net, Thomas Nelson Review Blogger

Joanna is a lonely teenager verging on adulthood and is kept as a virtual prisoner in her own home. Without father, who's gone all the time, and mother, who must have died, her only friend is Mrs. Ruggeley the housekeeper. When Joanna learns about The Far Enough Window, she explores, finds the window in a wing of her home that has not been used since her mother died and meets Robin Goodfellow, a friendly character from the other side of the Far Enough Window. Joanna finds her way through the window with Robin's help and explores Fairyland. She meets good characters and bad characters and learns moral values that only interaction with others can teach. In the end, she learns the secrets involved in her own life.

I enjoyed the story. However, one picture of Joanna nude seemed out of place. There are no sex scenes or obscene language. Toward the end, a series of jumps between dimensions sort of confused me for a short time, but once passed this area I obtained my mental balance once more. The ending isn't exactly 'And they all lived happily ever after'. Instead it leaves Joanna facing an uncertain future just as we face uncertain futures in our lives.

Author Bio:
John Grant, a pen name for Paul Barnett, has written sixty or so books, about twenty-five are fiction. They include The Far-Enough Window, The Hundredfold Problem, Albion, The World, Qinmeartha and the Girl-Child LoChi (published as half of a "double" with Colin Wilson's The Tomb of the Old Ones), two collaborative parodies with David Langford (Earthdoom and Guts) and the twelve novels of the Legends of Lone Wolf series. Under his real name he has written the two (so far) space operas Strider's Galaxy and Strider's Universe. His illustrated fiction Dragonhenge, done with Bob Eggleton, was nominated for a Hugo in 2003; its successor, The Stardragons, appeared in 2005. His serial novel The Dragons of Manhattan was published online during the latter part of 2003 by the global journalism website Blue Ear and has just been released in book form by Screaming Dreams Press.

His best known works of nonfiction are The Encyclopedia of Walt Disney's Animated Characters (three editions), The Encyclopedia of Fantasy (done with John Clute) and most recently The Chesley Awards for Science Fiction and Fantasy Art: A Retrospective (done with Elizabeth Humphrey and Pamela D. Scoville).

As John Grant he has received two Hugo Awards, the World Fantasy Award, the Mythopoeic Society Scholarship Award, the J. Lloyd Eaton Scholarship Award and a rare British Science Fiction Association Special Award.

1 comment:

  1. Interesting book. I don't think I would pick it up though. Something about the nudity and the dimensions jumping doesn't seem quite right in my head, but I wouldn't have known if I didn't read your review. =)

    Sassy, you're such a dedicated book blogger! I've never seen someone so eager to visit others and reply back, and there's so much content on your blog! I honestly wish I had an award for you.

    I'll keep revisiting! =)

    ReplyDelete

Thanks for taking the time to leave a sassy comment. It's truly appreciated. I aim to get back to you as soon as possible -- Sassy :)